Saturday, September 4, 2010

ARCHITECTURE-ARQUITECTURA TODAY: Australian Pavilion in Venice Showcases a New Perspective on Cities




VENICE.- At this year’s 12th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice, Australia is showcasing a collection of dramatic urban visions using ground-breaking 3D stereoscopic technology, allowing visitors to move around a range of existing and hypothetical urban environments. 

Led by the Australian Pavilion’s Creative Directors, John Gollings and Ivan Rijavec, the 'NOW and WHEN Australian Urbanism' exhibition will act as a catalyst for debate on the future of our cities, engaging in timely issues that include sustainability, urban sprawl and density, and immigration. 

The exhibition features two theatres. The NOW theatre highlights five of Australia's most interesting urban and non-urban regions as they are now, captured by Co-Creative Director and well-known architectural photographer, John Gollings. 

In the second theatre, 17 futuristic urban environments imagine WHEN we reach 2050 and beyond. Depicting Australian cities 40+ years into the future, these ideas are the result of a national competition set by the Australian Institute of Architects. The visions range from a city that is powered by mould, one that is based on ‘aquaculture’ and regions that are connected by central ‘spines’. 

“By combining the NOW and WHEN components, we hope that the exhibition provokes discussion around issues of urban density and sprawl and inspires society to question how it can improve its cities,” said John Gollings. 


More:
http://www.artdaily.com/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=40494

Thursday, September 2, 2010

ARCHITECTURE-ARQUITECTURA TODAY: Walking in a Cloud at Venice Architecture Biennale 2010



VENICE (REUTERS).- If you thought that the world's biggest architecture show would be about buildings, this year's Venice Architecture Biennale has a few surprises in store. 

Highlights include a steel ramp sneaking into a cloud, a pitch-black room where water falls from a swirling hose and a tower of metal cages from which one can jump into the void -- setting the tone for a show that, in a break with the past, this time focuses on people and space. 

Set in the 16th century rope-making factory of the Venice navy, the Biennale mixes design with art installation and has pavilions from 53 countries, plus around 50 works from some of the world's top names in the business. 

This edition is directed for the first time by a woman, Japanese architect Kazuyo Sejima. The winner of this year's prestigious Pritzker Prize, Sejima and her Sanaa studio are best known for designing the New Museum in New York and the undulating Rolex Learning Center of Lausanne. 

The initial reaction by critics to her Biennale has been generally positive, with many praising the show as entertaining and atmospheric and welcoming the break with previous text-heavy, worthy exhibitions. 


More:
http://www.artdaily.com/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=40416



Popular Posts